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Study: Watching Too Much TV Linked To Lower Sperm Count

Feb 6th, 2013

TV Linked To Lower Sperm CountCurrent studies show TV Linked to lower sperm count:Adult males who spend more time in front of the TV each week are likely to have lower sperm counts than men who seldom watch TV, according to a recent study conducted by the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The same study also found that moderate to heavy exercise increases sperm count among men.

“Guys, turn off the TV and put on the running shoes,” advised Dr. Jorge Chavarro, team leader and professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. “Adopting a less sedentary lifestyle may have a positive impact on sperm counts.”

Scientists have noted a decline in semen quality among men in Western countries over the past decades. Researchers wanted to find out if a sedentary lifestyle is a contributing factor.

The study measured the effects of watching television on the sperm count of 189 men, aged 18 to 22 years. Participants were asked about their TV and exercise habits, and other related data such as smoking, diet, reproductive health condition, and stress levels.

Researchers found that men who spent twenty hours or more in front of the TV each week had 44 percent lower sperm counts than men who spent much less time watching TV.

Fortunately, only sperm count declined. Sperm motility, shape, and sample volume remained healthy, the authors noted.

The team also found that men who exercised at least 15 hours each week had 73 percent higher sperm count. However, the increase was only noted among men who performed moderate to vigorous exercise and not among those who did light exercise.

The link between TV viewing and low sperm count is unclear. Researchers suspect that spending too much time in front of the television is but one sign of unhealthy lifestyle.

“The associations of TV watching and physical activity with sperm counts were independent of each other,” Dr. Chavarro said. “What we cannot rule out entirely is that our finding for TV watching is specific to TV or sedentariness in general.”

Researchers cannot conclude whether men who watch too much TV have problems in fathering children.

“Men in this study had not attempted to have children before, so we do not know how their own fertility is influenced by TV watching or physical activity,” Dr. Chavarro said.

“We know from other studies that sperm counts are related to fertility — higher sperm counts are related to higher fertility. Men with low sperm counts can still father children although they may have difficulties doing so,” he added.

Source: VISTA Health Solutions

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